It took doctors 7 pregnancy tests to discover the tumour inside her

lead image

Louise had a grade two immature teratoma, rare form of ovarian tumour which took up her entire stomach and pressed against her organs

It started out as persistent, sharp pain in her lower abdomen. Thinking nothing much of it, Louise ignored it until she began bleeding between periods. At that point, her alarmed husband urged her to go see a doctored

She did, but not before taking a pregnancy test—just in case. It came back negative.

At the clinic, she was advised to take another one. The second came out negative as well.

The couple from Kent, England came home that day not knowing what was wrong. But then Louise’s condition got worse.

She began to experience back pain, frequent urination, loss of appetite, difficulty breathing, and bloating. For good measure, she took her third test, and, alas, it was still negative.

Her doctors, convinced that she was pregnant, were baffled. They continued running tests on her, with one doctor saying, “there’s definitely something in there.”

It Took 7 Pregnancy Tests to Discover the Tumor Inside Her

Convinced she wasn't pregnant and unwilling to suffer through her symptoms, Louise pressed her doctors for answers until they took an ultrasound. The results revealed that there wasn’t a baby inside her but a soccer ball-size tumour that had been covering her ovary.

Louise had a grade two immature teratoma, rare form of ovarian tumour which took up her entire stomach and pressed against her organs.

In a four-hour surgery that required a three-month recovery, doctors removed the 20-centimetre tumour, one of Bryant's ovaries, and a fallopian tube.

Afterward, a biopsy revealed amazing news: The tumour was confined to Bryant's ovary.

Professor Hani Gabra, Director of the Ovarian Cancer Action research center, says, “The symptoms of bloating or a lump in the stomach could absolutely be mistaken for pregnancy but they could also be a tumour, or many other things. So it stands to reason that after one or two pregnancy tests you would then need to be tested for anything else.”

Photo: Cynthia Page/Flickr

If you have any insights, questions or comments regarding the topic, please share them in our Comment box below. 

Got a parenting concern? Read articles or ask away and get instant answers on our app. Download theAsianparent Community on iOS or Android now!

Written by

James Martinez