Teeth Eruption Order And Timeline: Baby Teeth And Permanent teeth

Teeth Eruption Order And Timeline: Baby Teeth And Permanent teeth

Here is all you need to know about teeth eruption order and timeline, for both baby teeth and permanent teeth. We also give you tips for baby teeth care...

The eruption of teeth is part of your baby or child’s developmental milestones. By the time a child is 2 to 3 years of age, all 20 primary teeth (baby teeth) should have erupted. In this article, we examine the teeth eruption order for both primary and permanent teeth.

The first teeth usually begin to break through the gums at about 6 months of age. Do note that, when it comes to teething, every baby is different. Some babies might start to teeth as early as 4 months, and for some, baby teeth appear as late as 1 year!

In some cases, a baby may be born with one or more teeth.

Here are some interesting facts about teeth eruption order in babies:

  • Girls usually get their baby teeth earlier than boys.
  • Premature and low birth weight babies can have delayed primary tooth eruption and enamel defects, putting them at higher risk for decay.
  • As a rule, for  every 6 months of life, approximately 4 teeth will erupt.
  • Lower teeth usually erupt before upper teeth.
  • Primary teeth eruption is usually symmetrical. Teeth in both jaws usually erupt in pairs -- one on the right and one on the left.
  • Primary teeth have thinner enamel, are smaller in size and whiter in colour than the permanent teeth that will appear later.
  • The spacing between children’s baby teeth is important because it allows enough room for the bigger, permanent teeth.
  • By the time a child is 2 to 3 years of age, all twenty primary teeth - 10 in the upper jaw and 10 in the lower jaw, should have erupted. 
  • The AAP recommends contacting a dentist if your baby hasn’t experienced any tooth eruptions by 18 months of age.

teeth eruption order

Primary Teeth Eruption Order

There are five different types of teeth your baby will develop during the first three years. Your baby will usually get his/her teeth in this order:

  1. central incisors (front teeth)
  2. lateral incisors (between the central incisors and canines)
  3. first molars
  4. canines (beside the first molars)
  5. second molars

It is important to note that baby teeth eruption times can vary from child to child.

Your child's teeth can fall out in any order, but baby teeth usually fall out in the same order they arrived. Also, if your child's baby teeth came in later than his peers, he/she may lose them later too.

Here we list out in what order baby teeth will (usually) erupt, and when they are expected to fall out. 

  • Lower Central incisor

When tooth emerges: 6 to 10 months

When tooth falls out: 6 to 7 years

  • Upper Central incisor

When tooth emerges: 8 to 12 months

When tooth falls out: 6 to 7 years

  • Upper Lateral incisor

When tooth emerges: 9 to 13 months

When tooth falls out: 7 to 8 years

  • Lower Lateral incisor

When tooth emerges: 10 to 16 months

When tooth falls out: 7 to 8 years

  • Upper First Molar

When tooth emerges: 13 to 19 months

When tooth falls out: 9 to 11 years

  • Lower First Molar

When tooth emerges: 14 to 18 month

When tooth falls out: 9 to 11 years

  • Upper Canine or Cuspid

When tooth emerges: 16 to 22 months

When tooth falls out: 10 to 12 years

  • Lower Canine or Cuspid

When tooth emerges: 17 to 23 months

When tooth falls out: 9 to 12 years

  • Lower Second Molar

When tooth emerges: 23 to 31 months

When tooth falls out: 10 to 12 years

  • Upper Second Molar

When tooth emerges: 25 to 33 months

When tooth falls out: 10 to 12 years

teeth eruption order

Why taking care of baby teeth is important

We tend to get lazy when it comes to taking care of our little ones’ baby or primary teeth because we know they will fall out to make way for the permanent teeth. 

However, baby teeth play a vital role as:

  • They reserve space for their permanent counterparts
  • They give the face its normal appearance
  • They aid in the development of clear speech
  • They help attain good nutrition (missing or decayed teeth make it difficult to chew, causing children to reject foods)
  • They help give a healthy start to the permanent teeth. Decay and infection in baby teeth can cause dark spots on the permanent teeth developing beneath it.

teeth eruption order

Tips for taking care of baby teeth 

  • Even before tooth eruption, parents can begin wiping the gums of a baby with a soft washcloth or soft toothbrush to establish a daily oral hygiene routine.
  • In case of breastfed babies, stop night feedings once teeth erupt. 
  • Fruit juices, soft drinks, sweet teas, formula, or milk should not be put in an infant’s bottle or sippy cup during bedtime or nap time. At these times, bottles or sippy cups should only contain water.
  • Introduce a cup as soon as the infant can sit unsupported (around 6 months of age) and try to eliminate the bottle by 1 year of age.
  • Clean or brush a young child’s teeth twice daily. Toothbrushes for infants and toddlers should be soft, with a small head and a large handle. 
  • According to the AAP, toothbrushing should be supervised until the child can reliably rinse and spit out excess toothpaste (usually until  6 years of age). Younger children do not have the hand coordination necessary for independent toothbrushing prior to that age. 
  • Parents should not allow their child to swallow fluoridated toothpaste.

Permanent teeth eruption order

Eruption for the permanent teeth begins between 5 and 7 years and usually finishes by 13 to 14 years of age. Your child will probably have all 28 permanent adult teeth at around age 13. The  four wisdom teeth will usually come in when he/she's 17 to 21 years old. 

The typical pattern for permanent teeth eruption is central incisors, lateral incisors, first molars, premolars, canines, second molars, and third molars (wisdom teeth), although not everyone develops or erupts third molars.

teeth eruption order

Upper Permanent Teeth Development Timeline

Central incisor

When tooth emerges: 7 to 8 years

Lateral incisor

When tooth emerges: 8 to 9 years

Canine (cuspid)

When tooth emerges: 11 to 12 years

First premolar (first bicuspid)

When tooth emerges: 10 to 11 years

Second premolar (second bicuspid)

When tooth emerges: 10 to 12 years

First molar

When tooth emerges: 6 to 7 years

Second molar

When tooth emerges: 12 to 13 years

Third molar (wisdom teeth)

When tooth emerges: 17 to 21 years

teeth eruption order

Lower Permanent Teeth Development Timeline

Third molar (wisdom tooth)

When tooth emerges: 17 to 21 years

Second molar

When tooth emerges: 11 to 13 years

First molar

When tooth emerges: 6 to 7 years

Second premolar (second bicuspid)

When tooth emerges: 11 to 12 years

First premolar (first bicuspid)

When tooth emerges: 10 to 12 years

Canine (cuspid)

When tooth emerges: 9 to 10 years

Lateral incisor

When tooth emerges: 7 to 8 years

Central incisor

When tooth emerges: 6 to 7 years

(Source: Cleveland Clinic, AAP, ADA)

Also READ: 13 natural teething remedies that you can try at home

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Written by

Jaya

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