Stolen Footage of Breastfeeding Mums, Children From Hacked Home Cams Sold On Porn Sites

Stolen Footage of Breastfeeding Mums, Children From Hacked Home Cams Sold On Porn Sites

The use of security cameras is common for parents who use them to remotely monitor their family. But hacking of security cameras is just as common. 

If you own security cameras to keep watch of your home, let this be a warning. It’s time to change your passwords and ensure your Internet Protocol (IP) cameras are secured. Yours might be one of the thousands of hacked security cameras in Singapore.

Hacked footage from security cameras used by Singaporean households have reportedly been sold and uploaded to pornography websites, with some showing those of breastfeeding mums and children—most of them in various state of undress or compromising positions.

Stolen Footage of Breastfeeding Mums, Children From Hacked Home Cams Sold On Porn Sites

According to reports, footage from hacked security cameras include those of breastfeeding mums.

Hacked Security Cameras, Footage Uploaded To Porn Sites

It is very common for homes in Singapore to have security cameras set up. Most families install IP cameras for security purposes. Parents, on the other hand, use them to remotely monitor their babies and children as well as other family members, household help and even pets.

But the hacking of security cameras is just as common. 

In a report by The New Paper, it said a group dedicated to hacking IP cameras has recently uploaded footages on pornographic sites, “with several explicitly tagged as being from Singapore.”

Hacked security cameras

Hacked security cameras in Singapore: Footage sold to porn sites. | Image source: Screengrab

It is said that the group of hackers has over 1,000 members across the globe and operate on social messaging platform Discord. The group claims its members can access more than 50,000 hacked cameras—from Singapore, Thailand, South Korea and Canada. The group has also claimed to have shared more than 3TB of clips with over 70 members who paid a subscription fee of US$150 (S$203) for lifetime access, as of 10 October. About 4,000 videos and pictures from the hacked footage, is provided as a “sample.”

A list of more than 50,000 hacked cameras that members can access, the group claims. It also claims that VIP members will be taught how to “explore, watch live and even record” hacked cameras through tutorials and guided sessions.

Protect Your Family From Hacked Security Cameras

Most surveillance camera networks are usually connected to the internet which then allows users to access them remotely for various purposes. This then makes cameras extremely vulnerable to hacker attacks.

To protect your family from falling victim to these attacks, here are tips you can follow:

  • Choose trusted brands offering reliable security features when buying IP cameras
  • Change default passwords and usernames
  • Update the software of your IP cameras regularly
  • Prevent cameras from sending information to third parties
  • Monitor your system for spikes in traffic

Though hacking incidents like these may make some users feel sceptical to use security cameras, it is not entirely unsafe—neither does it have to be. Follow these steps to lower the risk of hackers breaking into your security camera.

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theAsianparent

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