Dad shares his final moments with his son on Facebook and it's heartbreaking

lead image

"Please tell my boy I love him and I'm so proud to be his dad."

You know that popular phrase, “You only live once”? While many people have taken this out of context and used it as an excuse to do silly things, we should always remember the core meaning behind it. Indeed, we are only given one life and each of us have limited time on this earth. 

Some of us have more time than others. Some of us know of our impending demise, while others have no clue. Dr Ian Davis, knew that he had only a short time left in the world and he chose his last moments to spend with his only son. 

Ian suffered from motor neurone disease (MND), an uncommon condition which affects the brain and nerves. What is does, is that it causes the body to feel weakness that only gets worse over time.

Celebrating Dr Ian Davis’ life

Ian spent his life dedicating himself to FightMND.org.au, an organisation supporting the cause of MND patients. As its co-founder and inaugural Chairman, he had poured his heart and soul into the cause.

A statement released by the organisation upon his passing said: “Ian made a significant contribution to the development and progress of clinical research into finding an effective treatment and cure for MND. He fought the disease with great selflessness and dignity and we are indebted to Ian for his vision, passion and commitment to MND research and his legacy will live on forever.”

His legacy lives on in his son

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/45228776 10155565959896852 6907829307859533824 n.jpg Dad shares his final moments with his son on Facebook and its heartbreaking

Source: Facebook/Ian Davis

Truly one of the greatest legacies a parent leaves behind is in their children. In his goodbye message on Facebook, here’s what he said. 

“Today I say farewell. Thank you everyone for all the support, love, and compassion over the years during my fight. It has been some ride. I will leave this broken body with a full heart. Please tell my boy I love him and I’m so proud to be his dad. This photo taken yesterday is our final moment together.

You can help continue my fight by making a donation in my honour to my foundation at . You can also do me the favour of writing to tell my boy about me to his email address [email protected]” 

It was a sweet message that touched the hearts of many parents who left heartwarming testimonies and messages on his post.

Some gave the reassurance that the fight for MND will continue…

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/Screen Shot 2018 11 05 at 9.40.15 AM.png Dad shares his final moments with his son on Facebook and its heartbreaking

Source: Facebook/Ian Davis

Others promised to send little Archie emails to tell him what a great man his father was. 

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/Screen Shot 2018 11 05 at 9.39.54 AM.png Dad shares his final moments with his son on Facebook and its heartbreaking

Source: Facebook/Ian Davis

This is such a heartbreaking story, but with so much hope too. We wish little Archie and his family all the best and may he grow up to touch as many lives as his father did. 

What is motor neurone disease (MND)?

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/hospice 1821429 640.jpg Dad shares his final moments with his son on Facebook and its heartbreaking

Source: Pixabay

According to NHS, motor neurone disease is always fatal and can significantly shorten life expectancy. However, some people are able to live with it for many years.

For now, there is no cure, only treatments that can help to reduce the impact it has on daily life.

How to tell if you have motor neurone disease

  1. You will feel weakness in your ankle or leg – you trip easily, or find it harder to climb stairs.
  2. You might notice slurred speech, and find it difficult to swallow some foods.
  3. Your grip might become weak and you notice yourself dropping things frequently, or find it hard to open jars or do up buttons.
  4. Constant muscle cramps and twitches.
  5. Sudden weight loss due to a loss in arm or leg muscles.
  6. Getting emotional – difficulty in stopping yourself from crying or laughing in inappropriate situations.

To date, researchers have not found a reason why this disease happens to some and not to others. While mostly common in those who are in their 60s to 70s, it can affect adults of any age.

 

Source: NHS, Facebook

Read also: Young boy’s farewell to dying sister captured in heartbreaking picture

Got a parenting concern? Read articles or ask away and get instant answers on our app. Download theAsianparent Community on iOS or Android, now!