Eight-year-old boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

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Read on to find out what happened that caused an eight-year-old to be electrocuted, plus some safety tips for kids when dealing with electrical items at home.

boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

Boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery – Read on for the details!

As parents, we try to do everything we can to keep our kids safe at home. This includes ensuring that all dangerous items are locked and kept away to create a safe and stimulating environment for our our active little ones to explore

However, for one such family in Malaysia, things got a little out of hand last week when their eight-year-old was found dead after he was electrocuted while attempting to charge the battery of his elder brother’s mini motorcycle.

A fateful incident

As reported by The New Paper, Mohd Azmar Tahkim Mohd Asri was found unconscious on 5 March 2015 in the bedroom of his family’s home in Alor Setar, Kedah.

boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

Boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery: 8-year-old Mohd Azmar. (Photo: The Star Facebook)

His mother, Sarinah Akob, 40 and one of his brothers were sleeping in the next room when they heard him scream. Upon rushing to the room, they found Mohd Azmar lying on the floor.

According to one of his teachers who was at the Sultanah Bahiyah Hospital where Mohd Azmar was admitted, the eight-year-old boy was believed to have tried to charge the battery of his 18-year-old brother’s mini motorcycle by using a jumper cable connected to an electric socket in his bedroom.

It is believed that this caused a short circuit, and Mohd Azmar was flung more than a metre away.

 Tips to keep your kids safe at home

What happend to Mohd Azmar and his family serves as a reminder to all of us that the safety for all our kids – regardless of their age – should remain a top priority.

Here are some things to take note of with regards to your kids’ safety at home:

boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

Keep all dangerous items in your home in a safe place, and lock it up after use.

1. Keep all dangerous items away

Items that are deemed poisonous and hazardous such as medication, cleaning agents and electrical items should be stored and lock in places where your kids will not be able to access them. Make sure these are kept away immediately after use.

2. Buy play items that are age-appropriate

Do be selective when choosing toys and gadgets for your kids at home. Always make sure that the items you buy are appropriate for your child’s age.

If you have kids of varied age groups at home (e.g. teens and a toddler), always make sure that electrical items are locked away in a high storage cupboard where your toddler will never be able to access them. Do make it a point to supervise your toddler during playtime, at all times!

boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

Keep your kids out of bounds from danger by installing safety gates.

3. Install safety barriers

Areas in the house such as the kitchen and laundry room should be kept out of bounds from babies and toddlers to minimise the risk of poisoning, injury and burns. One great way to do this is by installing a safety gate or placing your tot in a playpen nearby. This allows you to carry on with your chores while keeping an eye on what is happening over the other side.

4. Fix covers for electrical points

As your kid enters toddlerhood, they start getting curious about anything and everything around your home. This includes wall plugs and electrical points, which they are eager to grab and tug with their tiny little fingers.

To prevent electrocution and to keep them from poking their fingers in the outlets, you might want to install power point covers to ensure their safety and for peace of mind.

boy electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

You should cover up those wall points to keep your tot’s fingers away.

5. Talk to your kids about S-A-F-E-T-Y

You might have set some house rules which you require your kids to follow at home. Make sure you also talk to them about safety. Be clear on what they should never attempt to do (e.g. Touch switches with wet hands) and the risks involved.

Go through these safety rules with them every now and then, and have it printed out and pasted on the wall. This will serve as a reminder and warning for them to be extra careful.

What to do if your child is electrocuted?

In the event that your child gets shocked by electricity, DO NOT rush to grab him/her until you are certain that there is no longer any electric waves passing through the body. This is to avoid the current from passing through your child directly to you.

boy gets electrocuted while charging mini motorcycle battery

Here’s what you should do in the event your child gets an electric shock.

Here are some things that you should do instead:

  • Turn off the source of electricity (e.g. light switch). If this is not possible, use non-conductive materials such as plastic or dry wood to separate the source of electricity from your child.
  • Check your child’s breathing and heartbeat. If he appears to be unconscious, call 999 to seek immediate medical attention.
  • If your child is responsive but looks pale or faint, gently lay him down with his head slightly lower than his chest, with feet elevated. This is to avoid him from going into a shock again.
  • Treat any burns on your child’s body with an antiseptic solution and bandage while waiting for medical attention.

 

Got more tips on dealing with electric shock and to keep your kids safe at home? Share them with us by leaving a comment below!


References:

http://www.tnp.sg/news/boy-8-electrocuted-while-charging-mini-motorcycle-batter

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Child_safety_at_home?open

http://www.firstaidweb.com/electrocution.html

 

 

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Written by

Justina Goh