Help, my child doesn’t want me to read to her!

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A screaming child, a torn book and a constant refusal to let you read to them. Sound familiar? Read more on how to overcome your child's resistance to reading, and also, find out if you have something to do with their attitude towards reading!

children's resistance to reading

Find out why your child might be acting up when it comes to reading time!

We have already discussed how important it is to read to your child on a daily basis and how this will help them become a better and more avid reader. But what if you’re a parent who makes time to read to your child everyday but your child is the one who refuses to partake in any storytime with you? This is a dilemma that some parents face and are sometimes at a loss as to what to do. We share some of the reasons why it can be a challenge reading to your child and discuss possible ways to remedy the situation.

RELATED: 10 speed reading tips

Getting rejected

Yes, getting rejected is tough, especially if the one rejecting you is your own child. But before you get wounded or all emotional and give up, you need to ask yourself if there is a reason why she won’t let you read to her. Sometimes a child resists their parents reading to them because they want to feel a sense of independence and conquer the challenges of reading on their own. Another reason could simply be because they do not like your reading style. Perhaps you have a tendency to correct their grammar or pronunciation during reading time or it has become too much like a reading drill as opposed to an enjoyable read. However, your child might put up a fight everytime you offer to read to her because she is having trouble reading and does not wish to confront that issue. Your reading time together might be a source of embarrassment for her, especially if she has low confidence in her reading.

RELATED: 5 tips to get your child to read

children's resistance to reading

Find out how to deal with your child’s resistance to letting you read to them!

Dealing with it

If the problem is you, the best thing to do is admit it to your child and ask her what you can improve during reading time with her. This humbling of yourself in front of your child will demonstrate how invested you are in the time spent reading with her and how you are willing to change if you are the problem. This could make your child more receptive to future reading sessions with you.

If the problem is your child’s reading confidence and the general sense of embarrassment, the best thing you can do is be encouraging and supportive. For example, when you do hear her read, commend her on the positives. By concentrating on the positives you will help increase her confidence in her own reading and once again demonstrate that you are there for her, no matter.

RELATED: 5 steps to achieving reading success

Did you face any challenges of reading to your child? If so, which challenges of reading to your child were the toughest? Check out the video below to find out how to read to your child and remedy the challenges of reading to your child:

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Written by

Wafa Marican