Teacher responds to primary school girl’s vulgar Facebook post

Teacher responds to primary school girl’s vulgar Facebook post

In a public display of rudeness, a primary school girl wrote a vulgar Facebook post, scolding her teacher. Amazingly, her teacher responded!

What happens when you allow angry children to use social media unchecked? You get something like what happened in this case. A primary school student publicly slammed her Chinese teacher on with an angry, rebellious and vulgar Facebook post, peppered with profanity.  

In her post, she taunted her teacher’s educational background “You think you from Raffles JC big sibo? Tink you cher I scared uh?”, the girl then begins to add vulgarities into her insults, alleging that the teacher “can’t even f***ing control the class.. Hate my status thn f***ing block me”.

vulgar fb

The teacher responds to vulgar Facebook post

The twist in the tale came when the girl’s teacher actually responded to her vulgar Facebook post by leaving a very long and eloquent comment below.

The teacher opened the response in a calm manner, stating “Since I see that you’re inflamed over my responses, then I feel that it’s best I answer you in the tone most appropriate for it.”

The unnamed teacher also responded to her Raffles Junior College remark, saying “Yes, I was from RJC, which is just the name of a school located in Bishan. Have I ever once mentioned that I am ‘big’ since I studied there?”

The teacher then continued to write a long post detailing the difficulties faced as a teacher striving to educate a rowdy, seemingly uncontrollable class. He or she talked about how the class had a high turnover rate in terms of teachers, as well as the reputation of the class for being at “the north end of the spectrum with regard to class control”.

The teacher then detailed the hardships teachers often faced in marking assignments, preparing homework as well as “devising lessons to ensure inspiring and quality education for students”.

It was a logical response that aimed to make the student understand where the teacher was coming from.

Over her head

Unsurprisingly, the long, logical response from the teacher went over the head of the student, who refused to read the comment. She merely said “C’mon la u Chinese teacher want type so much.. don’t act with suck ‘good’ eng k it suck and I seriously don’t feel lik reading is a waste of time.”

However, the teacher did raise some pertinent points to the student, that went unanswered. Some of these points read:

  1. Are you of legal age for Facebook usage?
  2. You are directly responsible for anything and everything you post online. Especially if it’s traceable by members of the public.
  3. Have your parents issued consent over the usage of Facebook given your non-legal age.

Answering these points

The teacher raised some valid points about a primary school student being active on Facebook. Facebook does have an age limit of thirteen for a reason. This means that only students upwards from secondary school could be legally allowed to use it.

The age limit acts to protect a child because Facebook is fast becoming a public arena. Therefore, a child should not be allowed on it without the proper level of maturity.

An immature person would use Facebook immaturely, posting comments and statuses without recognizing the consequences. It is almost akin to announcing something socially improper or illogical on a stage in a crowded area.

It thus falls to the parents of young Facebook users to monitor their kids’ activities on the social networking site. While it could prevent such vulgar posts, it could also help to protect the child against any potential online predators.

Facebook is no longer a private space, but a public social-networking platform. It is a powerful tool when used correctly, but it can be a grave danger if one uses it blindly.


Also read: Facebook messenger app: What parents and experts think

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Written by

Felicia Chin

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