Kindergartener dies while playing with monkey bars

Kindergartener dies while playing with monkey bars

Although it was clear from the investigation that her death was an accident, detectives are still trying to determine how she got into the position which killed her

Everyone has had an experience with monkey bars at playgrounds. And although there are many ways in which you can sustain an injury playing on them, none of them are anything like what happened to this five-years old.

Georgia kindergartener Andrea Tyrah Debruhl was innocently playing on the bars during school hours when she slipped and accidentally asphyxiated herself, reports said.

Freak accident

Although it was clear from the investigation that her death was an accident, her case has not yet been closed: detectives are still trying to determine how she got into the position which killed her.

Asphyxia or asphyxiation is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from abnormal breathing—choking, for example.

READ: Boy crushed to death by milk tanker

According to the Newton County Theme School district, 10 teachers and paraprofessionals were on the playground, supervising students at the time.

A vigil was held for Andrea at a local Methodist church, with more than 100 people, including children, in attendance.

Playground mishaps

The most common type of playground accidents are falls, accounting for more than 75 percent of all playground-related injuries. Associated with approximately 45 percent is the lack or or improper supervision.

It is true that there's just no way to completely prevent these kinds of bad things from happening to children, but parents and caretakers should at least try. Here are some tips:

Actively supervise children on playgrounds. It won’t be hard—they’ll probably be calling for you to watch them climb, jump and swing.

READ: 10 basic supplies in a parent’s first aid kit

Take your kids to playgrounds with shock-absorbing surfaces such as rubber, synthetic turf, sand, pea gravel, wood chips or mulch. If your child falls, the landing will be more cushioned than on asphalt, concrete, grass or dirt.

Dress appropriately for the playground. Remove necklaces, purses, scarves or clothing with drawstrings that can get caught on equipment and pose a strangulation hazard. Even helmets can be dangerous on a playground, so save those for bikes.

Teach children that pushing, shoving or crowding while on the playground can be dangerous.

If you have any insights, questions or comments regarding the topic, please share them in our Comment box below. 

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Written by

James Martinez

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