Want to raise a sensitive and a caring son? Get him these dolls!

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The choice of toys for your son might be making it difficult for him to express himself. Help him develop his sensitive side with these dolls.

Mums, growing up, what toys did you play with? Did your brother play with a GI Joe while you played with your barbie? Mums, you may not know but this might be the reason why it is easier for you to share your feelings and concerns with others than your brother.

And this is exactly what provoked Laurel Wider, a mum and a psychotherapist to change the landscape of toys for toddlers and young children. The product: crew mate - a non-super hero doll for your sons to bond with. The idea was to introduce him to a doll, not an action figure, who would be just like him!

Why is it needed?

Dolls are not just toys for children. They are a replica of human beings. So when your child gets a doll, she creates a persona around it. It is no longer 'it', but becomes her best friend. If you ask, your child would tell you a story about the doll. And this is the reason why it becomes easier for children who play with dolls to deal with humans in a better way. Ever been to a doll tea party? It is a serious event for the child.

So when you give your daughter a doll and your son an action figure of say, Batman, you are robbing your son from creating this story. Batman, however awesome he might be, cannot be a lumberjack if your child wants him to be. Give him a doll instead and this will stoke his imagination.

The biggest problem till now was the lack of male ordinary dolls without a story attached to them. Even Ken was and will always be Barbie's boyfriend. Laurel saw this gap, felt that it needed to be plugged, and came up with an idea of Wonder Crew, the perfect doll for your son.

The premise of the company is thus:

Each 15-inch soft-bodied doll, known as a Crewmate, combines the adventure of an action figure with the emotional connection of a stuffed animal.

Parents loved this idea and there are many boys today who have a Crewmate as a partner in crime as witnessed by this video

What makes it a good idea

If you are still stuck on the stereotype, here are 3 compelling reasons to get your son a doll.

  1. Emotional attachment. Children bond better with human figurines than the non-human counterparts. It is evident by the conversations they have with the dolls. Cars and guns are fun, but children do understand that such toys are just toys. And in today's age of overabundance on toys, this emotional connect is very important.
  2. A sense of sharing. Even with your best efforts, children do like to keep a few things to their own. They, however, tell everything to the dolls. Be it because the dolls are good listeners or they are available whenever the child needs them, the reason does not matter. It is necessary for children to share what they feel. Boys are socially moulded to 'man up' and keep things bottled. This is harmful to your son. So get him a doll and let him talk.
  3. Better relationships when they grow up. Though this is a result of the earlier two points, I felt the need to add them up here. A man in touch with his emotions would make a good husband. He would be empathetic towards his surroundings and by extension, to his spouse. Marriages where there is a lot of sharing last longer. So for his better future, do get him a doll today!

P.S. Don't worry. It is not going to change his sexual orientation as he grows up. There is no causal link whatsoever between these two, contrary to the popular belief.

(Story source: Upworthy; Image source: Facebook)

Also read: Mum creates breastfeeding Barbie dolls and they’re awesome

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