Samsung recalls Galaxy Note 7 after numerous reports of exploding phones

Samsung recalls Galaxy Note 7 after numerous reports of exploding phones

Reports say that 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7s had been shipped with faulty lithium-ion batteries, which could overheat and catch on fire.

At this point, you may have already heard about the potentially devastating news about the batteries in Samsung smartphones exploding.

Just recently, and incident involving a Samsung smartphone happened in Brooklyn, New York, when a six-year-old boy was injured after his device suddenly burst into flames.

According to New York Post, the boy was using the phone at home in East Flatbush on Saturday night when it suddenly exploded and caught on fire.

Speaking to the newspaper, the boy’s grandmother said his grandson was watching videos on the phone when it happened. The explosion was loud enough that it set off alarms in the house.

After the incident, the boy suffered burns and has since been staying away from any phones.

The Brooklyn incident is only one of the many reported cases of Samsung phones spontaneously exploding since August.

“The first reported case of a phone exploding arrived from China on August 25,” says a Fortune report. “Eight days later, with 35 cases reported worldwide, Samsung announced a recall, halted sales, and said all affected devices would be replaced.”

According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7s had been shipped with faulty lithium-ion batteries, which could overheat and catch on fire.

This is a huge number, and undoubtedly a cause loss for the company. they even described the high numbers as "heartbreaking." Despite this, Samsung is sticking steadfastly to the recall.

Next page: what to do if you own a Galaxy Note 7

What does it mean for those who own Galaxy Note 7?

According to the Fortune article, you don’t have to be too worried. Based on the collected data, the chances of owning an exploding Galaxy Note 7 are about the same as the chance of being struck by lightning in your lifetime (.009% vs. .008%).

In fact, you even have more chance of freezing to death (.02%) than being burned by your Samsung phone.

That doesn’t mean, however, that you should ignore all these reports.

If you own a Galaxy Note 7, Samsung urges you to immediately turn off the device and take it in for an exchange.

Photo credit: KKJ.CN

Republished with permission from: theAsianparent Philippines

 

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Written by

Nasreen Majid

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