COVID-19: Parents Not Allowed to Drop Children Off Daily at Grandparents’ Place

COVID-19: Parents Not Allowed to Drop Children Off Daily at Grandparents’ Place

Tightened measures to further ensure safety for the elderly amid rising number of COVID-19 infection in the country were announced by Health Minister Gan Kim Yong on Thursday (9 April).

Parents will no longer be allowed to drop their children off at their grandparents’ place on a daily basis, as part of the enhanced measures to ensure safety for the elderly and curb the spread of COVID-19 in Singapore, said Health Minister Gan Kim Yong on Thursday (9 April).

Speaking at the media, Mr Gan said the tightened measure is to minimise exposing seniors to the virus infection.

“Every time when you bring your children to your parents or to their grandparents, you expose them again and again to potential infection,” Mr Gan said.

“We should refrain from exposing them to the risk of infection as far as possible by avoiding frequent contacts.”

COVID-19: Parents Not Allowed to Drop Children Off Daily at Grandparents’ Place

Tightened measures to further ensure safety for the elderly amid the rising number of COVID-19 infection in Singapore have been introduced. | Image source: iStock

Safety for The Elderly

Mr Gan stressed that because the elderly and vulnerable are “most susceptible to severe COVID-19 infection, we should refrain from exposing them to the risk of infection as far as possible by avoiding frequent contact.”

He later explained that in situations where there are care arrangements for the grandparents to look after the children, parents should “leave  children with their grandparents throughout the entire circuit breaker period.”

24 hour clinics in singapore, Safety for the elderly

Image source: iStock

Meanwhile, for parents who work in essential services and might face issues in finding help in childcare, Mr Gan they “can also get help to place their children in childcare facilities.”

“We have made childcare services available for essential service workers. If there are no alternatives, appeal to us and we can consider on a case-by-case [basis],” said Mr Gan, highlighting that appeals will only be considered for essential services workers and when there are no alternatives.

Mr Gan also said that those who need to visit their elderly parents who live alone in order to help them with their daily needs will still be allowed to do so. 

“This, we will permit, but do try to reduce the interaction times, as far as possible, and observe strict personal hygiene,” the minister said.

Mr Gan also acknowledge that the measures “are very painful” but necessary.

“This is in order to protect them. Visit them only when necessary and not so frequently.”

Circuit Breaker measures

The announcement of these new measures comes days after the “circuit breaker” measures took effect on Tuesday—aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19 in Singapore. The measures ordered closures of most workplaces and schools shifting to full home-based learning. 

The measures, which will last until 4 May, allow only essential services to remain open.

Safety for the elderly

Amid the rise in cases of coronavirus in Singapore, the government has begun implementing “circuit breakers” to prevent further spread of the virus. | Image source: iStock/Rajaraman Arumugam

287 New cases in Singapore

Singapore on Thursday (9 April) reported 287 new cases of the COVID-19 infection, bringing the national total to 1,910.

This is the highest single-day increase coronavirus cases in Singapore since announcing its first case in January.

 

ALSO READ: How To Keep Our Elderly Loved Ones Safe During The Outbreak

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Written by

Nikki De Guzman

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