What happens to your baby after delivery?

What happens to your baby after delivery?

What happens after the cutting of the umbilical cord? If you have not taken a keen interest in finding out exactly what happens to your baby immediately after the birthing process, then the following points should give you some idea.

what happens after delivery

Find out what happens after delivery of your baby

Giving birth can be both a scary and yet wonderfully earth shattering experience. These feeling are even more pronounced if you are going to be a mum for the first time, although some mothers will attest to the fact that every time, is new and exciting for them. Most new mums to be, will automatically become avid readers, soaking up as much information as they can, about the eventual childbirth and consequent motherhood. If you have not taken a keen interest in finding out exactly what happens to your baby immediately after the birthing process, then the following points should give you some idea. Although most your parents tend to trust the doctor in the delivery room completely, there is really no harm in knowing and understanding the procedures involved.

  • One of the first things done after childbirth is the clamping and the cutting of the umbilical cord. This should not be rushed as allowing the baby to enjoy more blood flow from the placenta is encouraged, to help lower the risk of anaemia and iron deficiency.
  • Once this is done, a light clean up will be gently administered, as babies are born with some “gooey” stuff covering them.
  • Then your baby’s mouth and nose will be gently suctioned, as there is usually some fluid to be extracted. This is to ensure comfortable breathing and it will also allow your baby to “announce” himself/herself to the world.
  • Skin to skin contact is highly encouraged and as soon as your baby has undergone this initial stage of cleaning, he/she will be placed on you so that you can both experience the first bonding exercise.
  • This is followed with a general assessment process called the Apgar assessment. Your baby’s heart rate, muscle tone, breathing capability, reflex response and colour is examined and verified. This initial assessment is important, as it will help to detect any minor or major problems that may require immediate medical attention. Some facilities perform these tests while the baby is resting on the mother, but it is more a common practice to have this done in a specifically designed area.
  • An ID band will then be placed on both you and your baby for various obvious reasons. It would be prudent for either you or your birthing partner to be alert and ensure this is done before the baby is taken out of your sight.
  • Most facilities now routinely take footprints of your baby in copies of two, of which one set is kept by the hospital for its record, and the other is given to the new mum as a keepsake.
  • An antibiotic ointment or drops in put into your baby’s eyes to help prevent the possibility of infections occurring. After this your baby will be weighed and measured and given the vitamin K injection, to help clot her blood better and faster.
  •  If the baby is able to maintain normal and healthy temperature readings, the nurse will then sponge bath and wash your baby’s hair. Swaddled in warm clothes he/she will then be placed in the nursery.
 

Related: Bonding with newborns for Mums

Related: Caring for your newborn’s skin

Related:  Bare essentials for newborns

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Written by

Serena Mui

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