Swine Flu Survival: Things to do to reduce transmission

Swine Flu Survival: Things to do to reduce transmission

Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng told a news conference today that the measures taken by the authorities were no guarantee the swine flu virus would not break out in Singapore. Here are some things you can do to reduce the likelihood of transmission of swine flu.

Singapore Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng told a news conference today that the measures taken by the authorities were no guarantee the Swine flu virus would not break out in Singapore.

He said: 'We are a very open society. Many people come to Singapore, and Singaporeans travel overseas. It's possible that we can be hit by swine flu. If that happens, we must face it and deal with it. As a community, we must learn how to adjust.'

What can you do to protect yourself, you ask? No single action will provide complete protection, unfortunately, but taking a few steps can help reduce the likelihood of transmission of swine flu.

Wash your Hands

It may sound obvious, but hand-washing with soap and water for around 20 seconds is the single best thing you can do. About 80 per cent of all infections are spread by hand.

Use Sanitisers

Buy a few bottles of hand sanitizer, and keep them in your purse. Try to use them whenever you can’t get access to a bathroom to wash your hands. But do not overdo it, as sanitizers dry out the skin quickly.

Keep your Hands to Yourself

Try to minimize shaking hands or letting someone touch your child. It might seem a little rude, but you are better off telling people that you have concerns regarding the Swine Flu and are only being cautious.

Stay Away from Those who are Sick

Stay away from anyone who is sick. If you happen to work with someone that is sick, bring your hand sanitizer with you and boost up your immune system with Vitamin C.

Keep your Home Clean and Sanitized.

Keep counter tops, door handles and rubbish bins disinfected by using a bleach and water solution. Wash all bed sheets and pillows at least once a week.

It’s Okay to eat Pork but

Make sure the pork has been properly handled and cooked. Pork and pork products remain relatively safe as long as it has been cooked to an internal temperature of 70 degrees and above, says the Asian Food Information Centre (AFIC)'s executive director George Fuller.

Recognise the Symptoms and Get Help

Swine flu symptoms are similar to regular flu: fever, body aches, head aches, sore throat, cough, runny nose, vomiting, and fatigue. If you don't feel well, please seek medical attention.

To find out more about swine flu, do watch this video by the CDC Influenza Division.

Also read: First Swine flu death in Singapore

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Written by

Roshni Mahtani

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