Meghan Markle's pregnancy comes with 20 baby doctors and 5-star treatment

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Here's what pregnancy as a Royal looks like.

Fans of the Royal couple Meghan and Harry were over the moon to recently hear the good news: a brand new Royal baby is on the way. It seems the attention and care this pregnancy is getting is right-royal too. Once you find out the exact details, there will be no doubt in your minds that royal pregnancies are just so much more different than normal pregnancies!

Royal pregnancies: Meghan Markle’s “team”

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/05/meghan 4.jpg Meghan Markle's pregnancy comes with 20 baby doctors and 5 star treatment

Royal pregnancies: Meghan Markle will be cared for by 20 professionals 24/7 until her baby is delivered.

It looks like the Duchess of Sussex isn’t cutting costs for her baby. Reportedly, she’s hired a team of 20 medical professionals to care for her unborn child. Also, apparently they are strictly forbidden from drinking alcohol until the baby is born.

Specifically, the group is made up of obstetricians, midwives, anaesthetists, surgical staff, special care baby-unit staff, paediatricians, a lab technician and managers. These 20 gifted people were chosen after a lot of demanding interviews and will remain on standby 24/7 should any issues arise. 

Royal pregnancies not only get exclusive treatment, but they also wallow in luxury. The Royals deliver their children in their own personal room in the Lindo Wing in London’s St Mary’s Hospital, which costs a whopping £8,000 each day.

The Lindo Wing provides services that are no different to those of a five-star hotel. Personal rooms are furnished with their own satellite TV, radio, landline phone beside the bed, a fridge, free wi-fi and a selection of newspapers. After the baby has been born, new parents will also get to enjoy a special afternoon tea service to mark a new addition to the family. 

Meghan’s team will gather when she enters labour. However, just four of the 20 will reportedly be with her in the delivery room.

What mums can learn from Royal pregnancies

Mums, if there’s one thing Meghan got right, it’s that no medical team should ever drink alcohol when tending to patients.

And the same goes for you too, mums! Expecting mums should avoid alcohol while they’re pregnant because it can cause Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in your child after birth.

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2017/05/rsz alcohol 1282234 1280.jpg Meghan Markle's pregnancy comes with 20 baby doctors and 5 star treatment

Whether you’re undergoing royal pregnancies or not, no amount of alcohol is safe for any expecting mum. | Image Source: Stock Photo

What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome? 

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), simply put, is severe injury to your baby’s brain cells in the womb, triggered by alcohol that the mum chooses to drink. 

The alcohol travels rapidly through the placenta and crosses the baby’s blood brain-barrier. The alcohol then bathes the baby’s growing brain. The baby’s blood also gets filled with alcohol – as much as the mum’s – but remains flowing for longer. 

There are numerous effects of alcohol staying in the baby’s system, not limited to:

  • intellectual disabilities
  • a massive decrease in the body size and weight during birth
  • irregularities in facial features, which could alter the nose, eyelids, lips and jaw 
  • issues which lead to the heart, urinary, genital and skeletal systems and structures to stop working properly

A new study (2018) has also found that drinking any amount of alcohol is bad for you. 

Mums, we know pregnancy is tough. There’s morning sickness and all sorts of other conditions – like having pantangs to your diet, and especially alcohol. But you’ll see that enduring it is all worthwhile in the long run. 

We hope this article on royal pregnancies and alcohol during has helped you, mums. Like what you read? Comment or share it on your social media networks.

Reference: express.co.uk (for images)

Also Read: 

Top 4 causes of intellectual disability in a baby during pregnancy

Does alcohol intake pose a risk to the foetus?