Researchers identified reason behind multiple miscarriages

Researchers identified reason behind multiple miscarriages

Recurrent miscarriages may be due to the embryo being unable to form the early implantation stage, and the levels of Syncytin may play a role.

It doesn’t matter how many times you’ve experienced it; miscarriage remains one of the most painful and heartbreaking experiences a woman can endure. And a new study has identified one major factor that may be triggering a miscarriage.

According to a research conducted by University of Sheffield in England, and published in the journal Human Reproduction, a protein called Syncytin-1 is one of the elements responsible for the development of the placenta. It is also believed to be responsible for boosting the embryo's chances of thriving in utero.

“Recurrent miscarriages may be due to the embryo being unable to form the early implantation stage, and the levels of Syncytin may play a role,” said Harry Moore, co-director of the University's Centre for Stem Cell Biology and the study’s author.

“The significance of this is that the very earliest aspects of embryo development can affect what happens later in the pregnancy,” he added.

The researchers said however that more studies need to be conducted to understand the scope of Syncytin's role in embryo development, and how the level of this protein impacts that process, said a Parents article.

“Ultimately, the hope is that one day a blood test would be available to help doctors determine a woman's risk for miscarriage, and perhaps help her achieve a healthy pregnancy.”

What causes a miscarriage?

There are many reasons why a miscarriage may happen, although the cause is often not identified, says National Service.

“If a miscarriage happens during the first trimester of pregnancy (the first three months), it's usually caused by problems with the unborn baby (foetus). About three in every four miscarriages happen during this period.

“If a miscarriage happens during the second trimester of pregnancy (between weeks 14 and 26), it may be the result of an underlying health condition in the mother.

“These late miscarriages may be caused by an infection around the baby, which leads to the bag of waters breaking before any pain or bleeding. In rare cases, they can be caused by the neck of the womb opening too soon.”

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Written by

James Martinez

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