Singapore Maid Kills Deadly Cobra Using Broom Handle

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A Singapore maid apparently killed a cobra using a broom handle! Read some tips on keeping your family safe from these poisonous snakes in Singapore...

A black spitting cobra found its way to a house near Dover MRT recently, only to meet it's end.

According to reports, the family's maid hit it with a broom handle until it died.

Singapore maid kills deadly cobra

The incident apparently happened on 7 May, 2018, at a landed property home.

Mr Carlos Chua, 19, said the 50-cm long snake was first spotted behind plastic pails in the garden.

Mr. Chua told The New Paper, "It was acting aggressively to anyone who got near it. I knew that some cobras can spit venom, so I did not get any closer."

He advised his family to stay indoors, and to leash their beagle. The full-time national serviceman then went for work.

Their Filipino maid, Ms Mhelyn, though, was in no mood to give up. 

She has been quoted as saying, "I felt nervous when I saw the snake. Even though there was no one at home, I was afraid it might bite my employer." 

She tried using a 1m long broom handle to chase the reptile out, but the creature seemed to get more agitated.

"I didn't want to kill it at first, but it got angrier and refused to move."

She repeatedly hit the cobra with the broom handle, until finally, its body split up into two. She later disposed of the carcass.

What to do if you see a snake or suffer from a snake bite

The Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres) confirms that the equatorial spitting cobra or the black spitting cobra is venomous.

However, they are not known to actively attack people. 

Acres' deputy chief executive, Mr Kalai Vanan, told The New Paper, "Attempting to provoke, hurt or kill the snake would only aggravate the situation, which would cause it to be defensive." 

When faced with a similar situation, the public is advised to call the Acres rescue hotline at 9783-7782.

When threatened, the cobra might spray venom from it's fangs, which can travel a distance of more than 1m. It can even cause temporary blindness.

Getting bitten by this cobra can prove fatal. The venom affects the victim's nervous system.

Meanwhile, here are some tips on keeping your family safe from these poisonous snakes in Singapore:

  • Most snake sightings in Singapore occur in areas dense with trees. The best way to deter them from entering your home is to keep your garden neat and tidy. 
  • Avoid piling up grass and leaves in your garden - these spots provide shelter for reptiles. 
  • Keep in mind that snakes might be attracted to water features like ponds. 
  • Always keep your dog on a leash in unfamiliar, woody areas. 

If you see a snake: 

  • The advice from ACRES is that if you see a snake in the wild, you should walk away slowly and quietly. 
  • Do not provoke them - they will attack if they feel threatened. 
  • Snakes are nocturnal animals, so be aware of this if you are walking or running in woody or grassy areas at night. 
  • Tell children to avoid poking their hands into drain pipes or other narrow, confined areas - these could be hiding places for snakes. 
  • Never approach a seemingly dead snake. These creatures are adept at playing dead when they feel threatened. 
  • If you come across a snake in a built environment (home, a building, road, other confined area), call the Acres 24-hr wildlife rescue hotline: 9783 7782.

Snake bite: Do's and don'ts

DO: 

  • Call 995 for medical help. 
  • Keep the victim calm and as still as possible. A semi-reclined position with the bite wound below the level of the heart is best. This will help prevent the venom from spreading to other parts of the body. 
  • Tie a bandage 2 to 4 inches above the bite wound to slow the spread of venom in the body. If the bite area turns cold or numb, the bandage is too tight. Loosen it. 

DON'T: 

  • Apply a tourniquet, cut the wound or try to suck the venom out. 
  • Apply ice - this can affect blood circulation. 

Also READ: Sleeping toddler bitten by deadly cobra

(Source: The New Paper, ACRES, HealthExchange)

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