Parents murder their baby, almost kill their other children because they think they are going to die

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Destitution and depression drives a couple to try to kill of their family because they believe they are going to die.

There is no limit to which destitution can drive a person to. And the same thing happened when a couple from Myanmar killed their baby and injured their other two children while trying to kill them. The reason – they were diagnosed with drug resistant Tuberculosis.

TB affecting the lung. Image source: Wikipedia

Drug resistance has increased the morbidity associated with TB. In 1950s, it was a lethal disease. With the advent of good medicines for the disease, it was almost under control. However, due to various reasons, the bacteria developed resistance to conventional antibiotics and today, the world faces a threat from Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, a severe form of TB that is very difficult to treat.

In this case, the couple has been suffering from TB for a long time. According to the reports, they lived near Mandalay. Due to the contagious nature of the disease, they had trouble finding work. And when they were diagnosed with Drug resistant TB, they were so depressed that they decided to end their own lives as well as that of their children.

And so, on Monday, Jan 23 2017, they made their three children drink pesticides and attacked them with knives. Their one-year-old baby girl died on the spot whereas the other two children were hospitalised. The couple is being held by the police.

Tackling depression

Depression is not uncommon among parents. As a matter of fact, it is quite common in recent mums. Team it up with a lack of support and it is a recipe for drastic steps. These parents may end up injuring themselves or the kids. However, the good news is that with good support, the phase passes quickly.

From post partum blues to frank depression, the new mum (and at times the dad as well) may experience depression in some form. It is important to tackle the condition before it becomes too serious. The most common reasons for depression, as listed by Helpguide.org are

  • Loneliness and isolation
  • Lack of social support
  • Recent stressful life experiences
  • Family history of depression
  • Marital or relationship problems
  • Financial strain
  • Early childhood trauma or abuse
  • Alcohol or drug abuse
  • Unemployment or underemployment
  • Health problems or chronic pain

Whatever the cause may be, the person who is suffering from depression would exhibit these changes.

  1. Changes in the mood. The person often has a feeling of hopelessness or helplessness. In a conversation, these people would end up talking less, taking a negative tone, and are not very easily cheered up.
  2. Changes in the weight. A person affected will have a significant weight gain or loss. This is often attributed to the other symptoms, but they often have a change of more than 5% of the body weight in a month.
  3. Changes in the sleep pattern. A person may get up very early or he may oversleep. If this happens more frequently and suddenly, you should take notice.
  4. Changes in the appetite. A person may end up overeating or may lose the appetite altogether. This leads to changes in the weight. An isolated incident of happiness may lead to a short-term correction of the condition.
  5. Unexplained aches. The person would often complain of backaches, headaches without having any organic cause for it.

If you feel that you or your partner has one or more symptoms, you should meet a doctor. Depression can be treated, and many times, without any long-term medication. So do not wait for long if you suspect that someone is suffering from depression.

Source: Channelnews Asia, Wikipedia

Also read: ‘Smiling depression’ is very real, and it’s more dangerous than you think

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