We don’t want your children here

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In light of the recent news on casual eateries taking up the ban on kids, we bring you feedback on the issue and a compilation of restaurants adopting this ban.

no child policy restuarants

no child policy restaurants

The next time you head out to a restaurant with your children, you might be asked to check your children at the front door.  You see, they are not welcome anymore!

A no-child policy in restaurants is not new here.  Some years ago, several fine dining establishments barred the rights of children below 6 years old from dining at their restaurants.

Gunther’s Modern French Cuisine, a part of the Garibaldi group issued a “no children under the age of 7 policy at the restaurant”, while Japanese restaurant Kuriya Penthouse has a similar one.

However, the Japanese chain makes an exception on this policy on Sundays and public holidays.

Yes, we get it.  Kids are messy eaters.  They are loud and rowdy. And sometimes, they run around the restaurant endangering the wait staff and other patrons.   Some parents even take advantage of the situation and treat the wait staff as “cleanup” crew after their children.

While fine dining establishments have a valid reason for banning the children; it is afterall an adult place where proper decorum such as the ability to be quiet and remain seated at the dining table through a meal is required.    It is disconcerting that the causal eateries have also jumped on this bandwagon.  Some, even going so far as to ban children altogether.

It is not safe for children

The first of such eatery is PS Cafe, who will only allow patrons age 13 and above at its newest outlet at Ang Siang Hill.  Displaying a sign that boldly claims that this restaurant is for “adults and teenagers only”, the chain’s business development manager, Mr. Edward Lee, 32, said it was a ‘difficult decision’ to keep children out, and added that it was implemented from a ‘practical and safety point of view’.

‘We have patrons from the nearby Central Business District who use the place for their lunchtime meetings and they do not want children running around,’ said Mr. Lee.

He also pointed out that the shop house space is ‘not very child-friendly’: It has no place for parents to park their prams, and the second-floor dining area is accessible only by a flight of stairs.

Many like “ML” on online forum, Reach, says:“On one hand, we say we are pro-family. On the other hand, we ban kids from restaurants?  Later, we are going to ban old folks, foreigners … etc? Our society’s tolerance level is dropping lower and lower. If restaurants think this is a problem, they can state upfront that there will be extra charges if the kids do not behave in the restaurant (just like adults pay extra when they waste food in a buffet).  This seems like a more acceptable approach.”

Others like this anonymous guest contributor from the same forum disagree, saying that “the children should just go KFC, or fast food places. Some places are for adults. Children drink milk enough already. Last time libraries had adult section. Only those above 12 years old can visit. Now leh? All running around like mad on the streets. Must let the kids know what is adult and what is kids.”

Still, there are others who are more reconciliatory, like “Just1more” on ST Forum who says: “these restaurants could just create separate sections – adults only and adults with children under 6. No need to ban children lah.”

While the opinions shared by netizens have been polarized about the ban, many agree that the restaurant is an area for dining experience and children should at least be taught to respect and observe the rituals of dining out.

Here is a list of restaurants with no-child policy: