Mould infestation on baby’s cot!

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A local father was up in arms over a locally bought baby’s cot that was infested with mould. Find out where he got the cot from and what you can do to prevent mould growing in your house.

babycot Mould infestation on baby’s cot!

Care of your baby’s health and read about safety in the crib

Every parent wants the best for their kid and will go to all lengths to provide a safe, comfortable home for them. So imagine the horror this couple felt when they discovered a cot they had bought from a popular lifestyle and furnishing DIY shop had wood mould fungus growing on it. The fungal bloom was so extensive that the bottom of the baby’s mattress was also ‘infected’.

Help! Something’s living under my mattress!
The images of the ‘infected’ cot were sent to local citizen journalism site STOMP and according to the report, the parent, Tan emailed them the following:

“I purchased a baby cot from IKEA Alexandra for my newborn baby in Nov 2012.

“Now, fungus has grown and occupied the bed frame and mattress.

“This is very important and shocking to me as it may be harmful to my newborn baby had we found out only at a later stage.

“IKEA was informed of incident and they quickly collected the defective item back.

“They suggested we replace it with a new one but had no guarantee that the same incident would not happen again.

“The store manager, briefly explained that the growth of fungus was due to Singapore’s hot weather and humidity which is totally unacceptable for consumers.

“She then changed it from good replacement to cash refund. Even so, she expects us to collect the cash at IKEA to resolve the matter.

“This is not the crux of the problem. There was no apology and they do not view the seriousness of selling such poor quality goods which may danger the lives of newborns.

“IKEA should STOP selling the baby cots, it is not about the money. It is about the loved ones we care about.

“I’ve gone back recently, and the cots are still on sale there.”

A good excuse?
The issue that this parent has with the store was not only the lack of customer service but also the fact that the manager had blamed this ‘defect’ on natural causes. The climate in Singapore being humid, hot and wet year round is ideal for mould to grow on all furniture surfaces.

More expensive = better?
Netizens who have commented on the story suggests the parent to get a better cot from specialised baby shops such as Mothercare. The cots there might be pricier but they could probably control mould growth much better than the one got from IKEA.

Singapore, an ideal destination for mould
Unfortunately, no matter what furniture or cot you get, you can’t stop mould spores from settling into your home and Singapore’s climate present an ideal environment for mould to grow. However, there are some things you can do to prevent and curb wood mould growth in your home:

– Stop all water leaks first. Repair leaking roofs and plumbing fixtures.

– Increase air circulation within your home.

– Install and use exhaust fans in bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry rooms.

– Ventilate beds and mattresses often.

– Clean and dry water damaged carpets, clothing, bedding, upholstered furniture within 24 to 48 hours. If damage is too severe, consider throwing and buying a new one. 

– Vacuum and clean your home regularly.

 

For more articles related to baby cots and furnishing your child’s room, see:

Feng Shui and your baby’s crib

Kids furniture in Singapore

Spacing in a child’s room