The many forms of danger and how to recognise them

“Encourage your child to exercise extreme caution whenever she is off the ground, engaged in play, to prevent these injuries."

One of the most helpful things a parent could do to protect their children from harm is recognising threats and preventing them from leading into something dangerous.

Parents tend to think that all kinds of danger are one and the same, but Erin Schreiner, on her Modern Mom article, says that there are different forms in which danger manifests.

Being able to identify and properly categorize them will help figuring out how to avoid them, and more importantly, deal with them should they occur.

In-Home Hazards

The Many Forms of Danger and How to Recognize Them

Sometimes, the most dangerous place for your child to be in is your own home, for it is filled items possessed with the potential to harm, most of which appear harmless.

“Reduce the likelihood that your child is injured in your home by carefully covering all electrical outlets and installing child gates,” said Erin.

Remove hazardous chemicals and medications where kids can grab them. Ensure that the house’s alarm system is working and is on at all times, as well as the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

“It is important to remember that childproofing, no matter how carefully done, is no replacement for proper supervision.”

Outdoor Hazards

The Many Forms of Danger and How to Recognize Them

Potential hazards are heightened once you leave the comfort of your home. In an uncontrolled environment, everything is possible, hence, the extra caution.

“Encourage your child to exercise extreme caution whenever she is off the ground, engaged in play, to prevent these injuries. Also, remind your kid not to push and shove.”

Playground Hazards

The Many Forms of Danger and How to Recognize Them

Even though designed to be used by children and toddlers, playgrounds remain to be hazardous to children no matter the age.

“Encourage your child to exercise extreme caution whenever she is off the ground, engaged in play, to prevent these injuries,” Erin advised. “Also, remind your kid not to push and shove.”

It won’t also hurt to check the equipment in such places. If they appear to be unmaintained, or in need of repair, look for a different place instead.

Accident response training

However cautious you may be, however well-trained your children may be in navigating the precarious world they are in, accidents will happen, sooner or later.

“Prepare your child to respond to these unexpected injuries by training him in accident-response practices,” said Erin. “Teach your kid how to call 911, find an adult for help and put pressure on a bleeding wound. These simple things may make a big difference when your child or one of his friends faces a hazard.”

If you have any insights, questions or comments regarding the topic, please share them with us.