Family of a toddler strangled to death by a blind cord warns about its dangers

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“We are trying to get the message out there—it happened to be blinds but it could have been anything. There's always something somewhere so when you go home have a look around and check everything.”

The purpose of child-proofing the house is to eliminate all the dangers that could harm the little ones, making the house a safe haven for the whole family. But sometimes most dangerous things ate those you least expect.

A grief-stricken family from England are still reeling from the loss of their toddler when she was strangled to death by a blind cord.

src=http://ph.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/2016/04/story4 image 1.jpg Family of a toddler strangled to death by a blind cord warns about its dangers

Cathy and Bronwyn; Photo credit: SWNS

According to a report by The Daily Mail, “Little Bronwyn Taylor was playing at her grandparents’ house in Stoke-on-Trent when she became tangled in the metal cords and stopped breathing. She was rushed to hospital but nothing could be done to save her.”

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Bronwyn’s parents are letting their tragedy known so that it could be a learning experience and a cautionary tale for everyone.

“You hear about stuff happening like that but you think in the house you’re safe,” Cathy, Bronwyn’s mother said.

“We are trying to get the message out there—it happened to be blinds but it could have been anything. There’s always something somewhere so when you go home have a look around and check everything.”

Death by blind cords

“Most accidental deaths involving blind cords happen in the bedroom and occur in children between 16 months and 36 months old,” a report by ROSPA said. “with the majority (more than half) happening at around 23 months.”

While mobile, toddlers’ heads are heavier than the rest of their bodies, and their muscle control are not yet as sophisticated. If they found themselves entangled, they won’t have the ability to free themselves.

Additionally, their windpipes are still delicate; they’re smaller and less rigid, which renders them more prone to suffocation.

Blind cord safety

According to ROSPA, here some of the ways you can prevent this incident from happening to you and your little ones:

  • Install blinds that do not have a cord, particularly in a child’s bedroom
  • Do not place a child’s cot, bed, playpen or highchair near a window
  • Pull cords on curtains and blinds should be kept short and kept out of reach
  • Tie up the cords or use one of the many cleats, cord tidies, clips or ties that are available
  • Do not hang toys or objects that could be a hazard on the cot or bed
  • Don’t hang drawstring bags where a small child could get their head through the loop of the drawstring

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