Woman gets letter 31 years later to claim $2 from deceased mum's CPF

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“CPF are you trying to fool me or mock me after 31 years?"

Sometimes, when we can’t get the answers we want, taking it to our social media can be a much more effective way. At least, that’s what happened for Rahayu Mazlan, who sought to get to the bottom of the matter after receiving a letter from the Central Provident Fund (CPF) Board 31 years after her mum’s death. Anyone would think that the CPF withdrawal processing time took way too long… 

CPF Withdrawal Processing Time: “I was just curious about what’s going on”

According to the Straits Times, Rahayu Binte Mazlan, 51, had already obtained some CPF monies upon her mother’s death in 1987.

However, 31 years later, a letter dated October 4 from the CPF Board made its way to the housewife after being nominated as her mum’s beneficiary.

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/cpf money.jpg Woman gets letter 31 years later to claim $2 from deceased mum's CPF

The long CPF withdrawal processing time was in question. | Photo: Rahayu Mazlan

She approached an officer at the Tampines CPF branch to seek an explanation after lunch but her queries were unanswered.

As such, she took to Facebook on Oct 18 “hoping to get to the bottom of the matter”.

Rahayu: “I went to CPF yesterday. I said that since they had kept my late mum’s money, they should pay interest. They say that her case was after review so no interest. What I don’t understand is that why after 31 yrs then they review? What is going on with our CPF?”

Apparently, it was part of its “regular reviews” that led them to find “some leftover savings in her late mother’s account”. And it was supposed to be disbursed to her within two months in 1987.

A CPF Board spokesman in response to ST’s queries says that the amount was retained for a specific housing-related transaction.

Rahayu even e-mailed CPF, wanting to know how regular the reviews were given — seeing that a long time was taken to discover the balance.

Over time, the interest accumulated and “was deducted several months later for the transaction”. It led to an outstanding balance of under $2, the spokesman added. 

When Singaporeans buy properties using their CPF monies, they have to pay back the interest accrued back to the CPF board after they sell them. However, it appears that the same rule does not apply to CPF board holding on to the monies of deceased Singaporeans, as learnt by Rahayu.

The mother of five and grandma of seven in her Facebook Post: “CPF are you trying to fool me or mock me after 31 years? Before I got kids till now I have grandkids. Don’t know if I should be happy or angry”.

Even netizens jumped in to leave their comments, whether in favour of Rahayu, or not. 

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/jeffreyteng.png Woman gets letter 31 years later to claim $2 from deceased mum's CPF

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/teojengyih.png Woman gets letter 31 years later to claim $2 from deceased mum's CPF src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/Rahayu mazlan.png Woman gets letter 31 years later to claim $2 from deceased mum's CPF  src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/gerytee.png Woman gets letter 31 years later to claim $2 from deceased mum's CPF

What Are The Next Steps In Place?

The time spent to process the CPF withdrawal may be long but it was in the board’s effort to “disburse all unclaimed monies to beneficiaries”.

In line with CPF legislation, all outstanding CPF balances in dead CPF members’ accounts will earn interest up to seven years from the date of death. Thereafter, interest payment will cease.

If you’re one of the nominee(s) of the deceased member’s CPF savings, see how you can apply for the withdrawal below:

Online using my cpf

  1. Login with your Singpass.
  2. Submit an online application via My Requests.

Mail

  1. Download and complete the Application Form to Withdraw Deceased Member’s CPF.
  2. Mail it to:

Central Provident Fund Board
Withdrawal Schemes Department (WSD)
238B Thomson Road
#08-00 Tower B Novena Square
Singapore 307685

Upon receipt of your application and supporting documents (if applicable), payment will be made according to our service standards

Source: The Straits Times, Central Provident Fund Board 

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