Beware of hidden dangers in your baby’s nursery

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Mothers, is your baby's nursery baby-proof enough. Have you thoroughly considered the items currently in it before deciding if they are safe for baby. For tips on baby-proofing, read on.

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Is your infant’s nursery baby-proof enough?

The baby nursery is the number one place in your baby’s life that they should be able to feel is a haven of warmth, safety and security. There are, however, hidden and not-so-hidden dangers in almost every baby nursery. To see how your baby’ nursery measures up, keep reading. In doing so, if you find there are changes you need to make to baby-proof your baby’s room, don’t hesitate to do so.

Nursery essentials

Overkill is possibly the number one danger in a baby nursery. Not overkill in regards to baby proofing the area, but overkill on stuff. Most new parents fall for lots of media hype and purchase every gizmo and gadget they can get their hands on. You know–the things that every baby ‘needs’ to survive.

Instead, when planning and ‘constructing’ your baby’s nursery, stick to the essentials:

  • Crib
  • Dresser or chest
  • Rocking chair
  • Night light or lighting with a dimmer switch
  • Baby essentials-diapers, clothing, blankets, bibs, socks, wipes, pacifiers
  • Safety latches, outlet covers, etc.

Additionally, the non-essentials that make life easier are great to have:

  • Changing table
  • Nursery monitor
  • Murals, mobiles and wall hangings

Innocent dangers

After you have done everything you think humanly possible to baby proof your baby’s surroundings, you need to look again to make sure you’ve taken care of the most-often overlooked nursery dangers…

  • Blankets left hanging on the side of the crib. These can be pulled down by baby causing suffocation.
  • Dressers, chests and shelving should be anchored to the wall to ensure they cannot be pulled down onto your baby
  • Bumper pads should be breathable and woven through the crib’s rails to ensure the baby will not get caught in between the bed and the pad.
  • The crib should meet or exceed all safety standards.
  • The crib should be made of solid wood or old enough (gently used) that the chemicals used in making pressed-wood products will have leeched out and be gone.
  • Strollers and other equipment necessary for baby should be stored away so it cannot fall on your baby or cause you to trip and fall in the night.
  • Make sure the mattress and padding in the changing table pad is wool, cotton or free of chemicals.
  • Use eco-friendly paint on the walls.
  • If rugs are used, make sure they grip the floor securely.
  • Make sure the toys in your baby nursery are chemical free.
Baby-proofing your baby’s nursery isn’t difficult. Thankfully great strides have been made in the last ten years or so in regulating what goes into products our babies use and live with and how those products are made.

Child Safety Safety