Alcoholic mum drowns three-year-old son out of "frustration"

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Being aware of how to prevent alcohol addiction, or knowing where to seek help, is key to preventing tragedies like this.

There are many ways for mums to relax after a long day. For some mums, one of those is indulging in a good bottle of wine. However, have you ever wondered how too much alcohol can affect your family? A recent incident in Thailand show that alcoholic mothers stories don’t always have a happy ending.

Alcoholic mothers stories: Thai mum murders son after a few days of not drinking

34-year-old Rungthip Yothikar confessed to murdering her son, aged three, on Friday night (19th October), after being being interrogated by the police. 

According to police reports, the Thai mum drowned her son in a pond, as she was infuriated that she hadn’t been able to drink for a few days. 

Her son’s lifeless body was discovered afloat in a small pond a day before the alleged confession. 

src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2018/10/alcoholic mum drowns son intext.jpg Alcoholic mum drowns three year old son out of "frustration"

Alcoholic mothers stories: pictured are the Thai police and the mum. | Image Source: Stock Photo

What happened? 

On Sunday, 14 October, Rungthip departed her residence, taking her son with her. However, when she came back two days later, her son was nowhere to be seen. Rungthip’s family members suspected something was not quite right, and requested assistance from the police to look for the little boy.

The mother initially stated that she exited home alone. However, her relatives witnessed her departing home while being accompanied by her son. 

Following their interrogation, Rungthip eventually confessed to local police that she brought her son to the pond. She then drowned him from anger and frustration — she was an alcoholic but had not been able to drink for the past few days. 

This tragedy could have been prevented had the mum known two things:

  • how much alcohol is considered excessive and leads to addiction over time?
  • is there support available if I get addicted to alcohol?

Exactly how much alcohol is too much?

According to the National Addiction Management Services, or NAMS for short, excessive drinking can impact your health, connections with others, family and work life.

Getting addicted to alcohol means that your body relies on it for pleasure. Ultimately, you drink more than necessary, which can lead to:

  • liver damage
  • cancer of the stomach cancer
  • injuries of your brain and nerves.

Here’s a simple guide to drink in moderation:

  • Adult men should limit alcohol consumption to two standard drinks daily.
  • Women should limit their consumption to one standard drink each day at maximum.
  • Expecting mothers should completely avoid drinking at all. Alcohol can lead to serious developmental issues, such as fetal alcohol syndrome. 

When we say “standard drink”, that refers to a beverage containing 10 grams of alcohol. In practical terms, that’s roughly: 

  •  one can (330ml) of beer, with 5% alcohol content
  •  half a standard (175ml glass), containing 15% alcohol
  • one shot (35ml) of a spirit with 40% alcohol
src=https://sg admin.theasianparent.com/wp content/uploads/sites/12/2012/10/alcohollead 360x178.jpg Alcoholic mum drowns three year old son out of "frustration"

Alcoholic mothers stories: Pregnant mums should not drink alcohol at all. | Image Source: Stock Photo

Where can I seek treatment in Singapore?

There are several rehabilitation centres in Singapore to kick alcohol addiction, including NAMS. In particular, NAMS provides a variety of services to help every unique individual, like:

  • evaluating the alcoholic’s condition
  • making a special detox programme for patients who are admitted
  • providing support groups where client and family members can talk to post-treatment.
Taking the first step isn’t easy, but it’s critical to get better. Remember, these services are here to help you and work with your family. Don’t be afraid to ask if you’re unsure of anything – it’s normal if you’re anxious and worried about what might happen. 
 
Here’s a short list of where you can find help in Singapore, including recommendations from the Health Promotion Board:

NAMS

To enquire: 6389 2000
To make an appointment: 6389 2200
All Addictions Helpline: 6-RECOVER (6-7326837)
National Problem Gambling Helpline: 1800-6-668-668
Email: [email protected]
Check out their website at: www.nams.sg

The Cabin: 

Address: The Cabin, Suite 11-02, 11 Floor, Novena Medical Centre, 10 Sinaran Drive Singapore 307506

Phone: 

Local 3158 9949
Overseas +65 3158 9949

Alcoholics Anonymous:

Office Number: 6475 0890
Address: 1 Commonwealth Drive, Singapore 149603
Email: [email protected]
Check out their website at: http://www.singaporeaa.org

Al-Anon: 

Office number: 9894 1201
For Emails: [email protected]
Check out their website at: www.al-anonsingapore.org

We Care Community Services:

Addiction Helpline: 6471 5346
Address: 620 Tiong Bahru Road Singapore 158789
Email: [email protected]
Check out their website at: http://www.wecare.org.sg/

References: NAMS, HPB, The Cabin, asiaone
Also Read:

Recognising signs of teenage substance abuse

4 Important things to know about alcohol and breastfeeding