8 ways to be a better parent

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Have you got what it takes to be a great parent? If you're in doubt, read this article for some parenting tips and ways to be a better parent

To complicate matters further, methods that work in come cultures are simply frowned upon in others. Even getting it right with one child, does not necessarily mean the same style will help with your other  child. If feelings of frustration and defeat, are usually the common outcome of confrontations with you little darlings, then some of the following innovative methods should be considered, before you lose your sanity. Here are some tips that we think will help you become a better parent to kids. 

Saving

Saving is not a natural capability, but if you promise to reward the child by matching the amount saved, the resulting effort will certainly surprise you, and maybe even your child.

Freedom

Allowing your child the freedom to choose how his/her time is spent can sometimes bring about pleasant surprises. Structured daily routines do not really allow your child to build on their own decision-making capabilities, nor on their innovativeness.

Be affectionate

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How to be a better parent to kids: #2 – Be affectionate

Although Asian parents are slowing becoming more publicly demonstrative in their display of love and physical bonding, more often than not it’s the negative display of reprimands that occur in public. Be free with your hugs and kisses instead of presenting your child with a cookie or sweet treat to keep him/her happily distracted.

Be calm but firm

Learn to handle disruptions or impossible behaviour tantrums with quiet and calm yet firm tones. Reserving such tones for these specific situations will teach your child to recognise your authority immediately. In the old days, a parent had to only “look” at the offending child in a particular way and the child immediately understood the consequences of not responding accordingly.

Embrace change

Being constantly ready to embrace change is something most parents fail to do. What may have interested your child at the age of 5 may not be as attractive to him/her at age 6. Recognise that your child is constantly learning and exploring.

Start traditions

Starting little traditions that only you and your child share, is another way to build special bonds. Ideally, this should be a fun activity, that also allows your child the freedom to be “chatty” as you will eventually appreciate this chattiness, as a way of learning new bits of information about your growing child’s life.

Take charge

Don’t be afraid to take charge and set boundaries for your child. Although children usually fight this, they also silently crave for such limits to keep them safe.

Be flexible

A smart parent, knows when to lay down the law and when to let things slide. Constantly nagging your child about everything will only make him/her more inclined to rebel. This is evident even at the toddler stage.